Huawei Has A BIG PROBLEM

So the US Government wants to ban all Huawei devices including smartphones, not only just in America but in other countries as well. The US government is concerned that Huawei is a cybersecurity threat. They fear that the devices could be used to spy on users and could be easily controlled by the Chinese intelligence agencies. The United States is now particularly concerned that these devices could be used against American military bases abroad. And now they have petitioned countries such as Germany, Italy and Japan to reject Huawei.

Best Huawei Products 2019

And are even considering offering financial incentives to countries who opt not to use Huawei’s devices. Huawei came out and said that they operate independently from its government, but one senator claimed earlier this year that even though Huawei might have the best of intentions-work hard, foster a good reputation, make a profit-but the Chinese intelligence law undercuts those intentions by making it clear that Chinese organisations are expected to support and cooperate in national intelligence work.

Basically, they make internet infrastructure. Huawei has ties to the Chinese government, this isn’t speculation, it is a fact. Based on this, the US and several other countries (such as Australia, New Zealand, and now Japan) are either banning or advising against using Huawei infrastructure, fearing that China could have back door access to their infrastructure, which would obviously be a massive threat to national security. It’s important to note that as of now there is no evidence that there is a back door, however, steps are still being taken to curtail deployment of Huawei infrastructure for a few reasons: 1.

It wouldn’t be unusual for China to try to get backdoors into other countries’ infrastructure because they’ve done it before. 2. Even if it was unlikely to be the case, it is still a risk to national security that can’t be ignored 3. Huawei hasn’t released source code proving they are free of Chinese government tampering Some, however, say that this is all baseless and it’s just an attempt to stunt the growth of Chinese infrastructure companies. They say this is all just part of a trade war with China. And It’s totally plausible. There’s also the point that banning Huawei on the basis that they might be doing wrong is basically guilty until proven innocent. I hope I’ve explained that in a way that isn’t overly one-sided. It’s really tough because there’s plenty of fair points on both sides here. Personally, I’m not sold on whether there are backdoors, but I’m thinking maybe we should opt with a more transparent and trustable infrastructure provider regardless…

Article 7 of China’s National Intelligence Law states and I quote, “All organizations and citizens shall, in accordance with the law, support, cooperate with, and collaborate in national intelligence work, and guard the secrecy of national intelligence work they are aware of…”. That said, This is not good for Huawei. I mean this could be the worst thing that could happen to any multi billion dollar company. They already lost the United States market, which is the biggest market for any smartphone company out there interms of revenues or profits. If more countries come forward in banning Huawei smartphones and Huawei products in general then oh boy… So Huawei wants to beat Samsung in their own game by launching the world’s first punch hole display smartphone.

We have leaked hands-on images of Huawei’s next phone with this new display design, which is Huawei’s take on Samsung’s Infinity O display. And This will launch in December. Interestingly the Galaxy A8s which will have an Infinity O display will also launch in December. So it’s really interesting to see who’ll come out with this first. By the way, it really doesn’t matter who’s first, all that matters is who does it best. But it’s a bragging right that companies love to own, and understandably so since it’ll be remembered for years.

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